5 Steps to Remembering Names

A person’s name is to [them] the sweetest and most important sound in any language.” – Dale Carnegie, American writer

When Shakespeare famously wrote – “What’s in a name?” – He was certainly not talking about humans. 

Not only do others identify us by a name, we too identify ourselves with our name.

Meeting someone and addressing them by their names immediately sets a connection and opens the gates to a great productive relationship.

But often, people face the issue of forgetting names when they meet someone again. 

Here are some simple tips to remember names.

Stop saying that you’re bad at names

When you say you’re bad at names, it is almost like a self-fulfilling prophecy. 

You also get off on the wrong foot in any conversation by saying you can’t remember names. 

Not only do you come across as arrogant but the person you’re meeting may feel that they’re not worth a little extra effort on your part.

Say their name back to them

When someone introduces themselves, shake their hand, smile, and say it back to them with thoughtful intention. 

Make it about the other person. This will make the person you’re meeting feel important.

Make associations in your head

When someone tells you their name, discreetly and quickly, make as many associations in your head with this person’s name as you can.

And take the liberty to make the association as crazy as it takes to stick. Whatever it takes! But Ssshhh…Don’t let the person know about the internal associations.

Say their names slowly – one more time – before parting ways

After the conversation is wrapping up, repeat the person’s name. Look them in the eye while you do it.

Make it slow and intentional, and you’ll ensure that the person you’re speaking to you feels heard. That’s a great start to any relationship.

If you do forget, own up and ask

It’s only human to err. So, own up and ask again. Only shows that you’re willing to ask for help and are trying to do better. 

Ask for the person’s name again and apologize. Remember to point out something else you were talking about so that the person knows you were paying attention to the conversation.

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