Adobe Photoshop Turns Twenty – Founders Expected to sell only 500 Copies/Month

Adobe Photoshop has turned 20 years old (omg!) and the founders, when they launched the product expected to sell only 500 copies a month.

In 1987, Thomas Knoll developed a pixel imaging program called Display. It was a simple program to showcase greyscale images on a black-and-white monitor. However, after collaborating with his brother John Knoll, the two began adding features that made it possible to process digital image files. The program eventually caught the attention of industry influencers, and in 1988, Adobe made the decision to license the software, naming it Photoshop, and shipping the first version in 1990.

“Twenty years ago, Adobe predicted that it would sell 500 copies of Photoshop per month,” said Thomas Knoll, co-creator of Photoshop at Adobe. “I guess you could say, we beat those projections! It’s amazing to think that millions of people use this software today. We knew we had a groundbreaking technology on our hands, but we never anticipated how much it would impact the images we see all around us. The ability to seamlessly place someone within an image was just the beginning of Photoshop’s magic.”

Over its 20-year history, Photoshop has evolved significantly from a simple original display program to a wildly popular application that has over 10 million users worldwide. With each release, Adobe has introduced technological innovations that defy the impossible. Layers, introduced in Photoshop 3.0, gave designers the ability to create complex compositions easier than ever before. The Healing Brush, another groundbreaking feature introduced in Photoshop 7.0, allowed users to magically retouch images by seamlessly removing blemishes and wrinkles, while preserving lighting and texture. Photoshop tools like crop, eraser, blur and dodge and burn have become part of the creative vernacular worldwide.

Recently, the product was used for making of Spielberg’s Avatar and this video will show you how Adobe was used for film production.




On a related note, read this : Piracy – Is it really that bad? I don’t think so, where I have argued that Adobe should stop running after piracy, as if not for piracy, Indian web designers wouldn’t have been addicted to the tool.

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