Buying chocolates is impulsive. Here is how Hershey is trying to replicate the experience online

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There is one thing common between a local store and a super-market, which is so evident but still not. It is the placement of the candies/toffees/chocolates at the check-out counter.

Candies have always been an impulse buy, not only for kids but also for adults, that brief spell of time when you are being “checked out”, the entire attention is focussed on those little bars and toffees and the lure of sugar is strong enough to tempt most humans to “buy some” for self or others, in that nick of time.

So, if chocolates are an impulsive buy, how does one create the same ‘magic’ of impulse buying online?

Hershey has been looking for this answer for some time.

And the answer was simple to come, if most of the chocolate buyers buy at checkouts in a store, may be the same could apply at check-out in an online store?

Customers may see a recommendation for a Hershey product after they’ve already placed their order with a retailer like Amazon.

Here’s how it works: After you check out, you see a countdown clock that lets you add a Hershey product to your basket within the given time.
That may recreate the pressure you feel when deciding whether to pick up a chocolate bar as the line moves you closer to checkout.

Less self-control during checkout

Another trick is to prompt customers to add Hershey’s so that they can qualify for free shipping. Who does not want free shipping after all?

“Shoppers generally show less self-control as they near checkout. “If you suddenly get an offer toward the beginning, you’ll turn it down,” By the end, you may feel like you “deserve a treat.”

Early indications suggest the strategy is working

In the three months ending in July the company’s e-commerce sales surged more than 30% compared with the previous quarter.

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