How to get better at arguments

Many times we find ourselves in situations where we struggle to put forward your point and argue in its favor. So how do you approach such situations? 

Worry not, science to your rescue. 

Yes, there is an entire branch of science devoted to this — the study of disagreements — erisology.

A study in the journal Psychological Science indicated that people often aren’t able to articulate their arguments well. 

If you ever find yourself in such a situation, start by asking your opponent about their beliefs. 
This works two ways. Not only do you get to know about their viewpoint but by explaining your opponent may end up diluting his/her extreme views! This can help you to have the upper hand.

Another great way to get better at arguments is to use the moral foundation’s theory. 
According to the theory suggested by social psychologist Jonathan Haidt, our ‘taste buds’ exist in six major areas: care, fairness, loyalty, authority, sanctity, and liberty.

A study conducted in 2017 showed that left-leaning people choose to care, whereas right-winded people prefer loyalty, authority, and sanctity. 

Two common choices between these groups are fairness and loyalty. 

Understanding the things that matter the most to your opponent and reframing your argument accordingly will benefit you eventually.

Eye contact plays an important role when it comes to any dialog.

A study conducted by the University of British Columbia suggested that the more time participants spent looking at a speaker’s eyes, the less persuaded they were by their argument.

 So if you’re talking, avoid eye contact with your opponent!

Via

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