64% Indians Have Suffered Privacy Breach Yet…No One Gives a Damn

A survey has found that vast majority of Indians don’t care about their privacy. They don’t change their password regularly, and even their data is breached, they continue to share it.
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How much do Indians care about their privacy? According to a survey by EMC, a vast majority of the citizens have faced a data breach. Furthermore, most of us still don’t mind sharing info with others which can very well jeopardize their privacy.

The survey which consisted of mostly respondents from the age group of 18 to 34, found that Indians have been trading their data for greater online convenience — which mostly includes better service from consumer and e-commerce websites. Coming from a joint family and closed neighbourhood environments, a vast majority of these respondents don’t really mind sharing information with others.

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While interacting with government bodies, 70% of the respondents were willing to share their personal information. Similarly, 63% people shared information when it came to the medical sector, 66% for financial, 57% while interacting with job-related websites, 57% while accessing online stores, and 52% people were willing to broadcast private information on social networks seeking an expanded friend circle. The study suggests that Indians are almost twice as eager to share their info than the rest of the world.

Interestingly, consumers in India don’t trust the organizations’ ethics as much as they trust the skills of the same firm. The confidence the respondents showed in the skills of the organization was tad higher than the trust the same group of people had in the ethics of these organizations.

Over 50% of the respondents believed that their privacy is more restricted now than before. Many of them are aware of the surveillance programs that track their online activities, patterns and behavior. However, overall 64% of them still trust the government. The primary reason of this are the several statements that the government has issued to make cyber security more powerful.

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However, the most alarming discovery of the survey was that 64% of respondents are aware that their data has been breached. However, 52% of them are quite comfortable in still sharing their private info and haven’t even taken any counter-measures. The survey also found that 21% of respondents don’t bother reading privacy statements; 41% don’t change their passwords regularly; 21% don’t take control of their privacy settings on various social networks; and 28% don’t have any password protection on their mobile handsets.

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