Rediff’s Homepage Looks Ugly [Again]

When Rediff unveiled its ad-less homepage design in 2009, it was considered a gutsy step by the company to bring a non-intrusive experience and importantly, set standards for others to…

When Rediff unveiled its ad-less homepage design in 2009, it was considered a gutsy step by the company to bring a non-intrusive experience and importantly, set standards for others to follow.

The impact of removing those ads was a clear loss of 16% in revenues [Sep Quarter, 2009] and even Rediff’s Q3’ 2011 revenues number do not show a great jump.

For the quarter ended December 31, 2011, India online revenues remained at the same level sequentially and declined by 7% on a year on year basis in rupee terms. However, a 14% decline in the Indian Rupee as compared to the US dollar is reflected in a decline in India online third quarter revenue by 18% on a year on year basis in dollar terms. Further, our third quarter US revenues remained at the same level sequentially and declined by 19% on year on year basis.

The obvious change post quarterly earning is the homepage design and this is how Rediff looks now.

rediffhomepageNot that I have a problem with the design, but I am out of words when it comes to ‘grab-my-attention’ areas on the site. The deal ads and featured content take away the focus to the right side, though one is visiting Rediff for its content (which is left a-side, pun intended). Doesn’t this defeat the basic UX principle?

Good Read: Remember Rediff?

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