Spamming – the Indian Startup way

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Won’t take names, but you should be able to guess:

Startup #1 :

Two ways to spam:

  1. Sends emails from different names, and different ids.
  2. Also sends email from the team@x.com id – which is the official mailer id.

One can block the second one, but never the first one. Why? Because you don’t know which id will be used next time they spam you!

End result : Spam.

Startup #2:

  1. Sends a weekly mailer, but quite lately has been using unusual names (hint:bird). The portal tries to be funny with the news item that they send, but the big deal is unsubscribe@x.com id throws following response:
  2. The mail system
    <grfultobulk@ourmail.x.com> (expanded from
    <unsubscribe@x.com>): cannot update mailbox /var/mail/grfultobulk
    for user grfultobulk. error writing message: File too large
    Final-Recipient: rfc822; grfultobulk@ourmail.x.com
    Original-Recipient: rfc822; unsubscribe@x.com
    Action: failed
    Status: 5.2.2
    Diagnostic-Code: x-unix; input/output error.

    Hmm..so the unsubscribe mail size was too large to handle?

Identify the above mentioned startups. The first 5 winners stands a chance to win z-pods (i.e. the z-version of iPod – we will ship once they are launched :D).

Aside, the point behind this post is not to demean any startups’s “marketing stunt’, but instead to discuss whether spamming strategy works or not.

I still get mails from other startups, but don’t really consider them as spam, since

  • they aren’t a frequent spammer
  • opting out is quite easy and
  • most importantly, I find something interesting in their emails. (feature release, cool wordings etc)

What’s your opinion? Does spamming strategy works? From what I see, it can potentially piss off one’s users and is actually a ‘anti-marketing’ strategy!

How do you market then? Read some guerrilla marketing tips

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