TheSunnyMag: How the mobile revolution is tripping up tech giants; Rich Dad, Poor Dad’ Author Files for Bankruptcy

TheSunnyMag

Inc.

Mobile revolution, economy trip up tech giants: Disappointing earnings from Intel Corp, Microsoft, Google and AMD underscore how Silicon Valley, both the old guard and the new, is struggling to profit from consumers’ waning love affair with the stalwart PC and infatuation with mobile– the most significant tectonic shift in the industry since the advent of the Interne, writes Poornima Gupta in Reuters. Read more of the story which takes a look of American tech giants and their tryst with destiny.

‘Rich Dad, Poor Dad’ Author Files for Bankruptcy for His Company: Not like Robert T Kiyosaki, the author of several best selling self help books is actually bankrupt. Kiyosaki’s Rich Global LLC has filed for bankruptcy, making it to the headlines all over the Internet. Though Rich Global LLC has filed for bankruptcy, he reportedly conducts business through a number of corporations, including Rich Dad Co. Read the full story here.

Google’s Printing Mishap: THE big story last week was Google’s earnings leak. Google got burned on Thursday by a very old-school mistake: Its printer messed up. Shares of Google (GOOG) plunged 9 percent in the afternoon after a lousy earnings report was mistakenly sent to the Securities and Exchange Commission before the company intended. The stock stopped trading on Nasdaq (NDAQ) after Google’s share price fell from $755 to $681 between 12:30 p.m. and 12:38 p.m. This, of course, is why firms tend to wait until the market has closed before releasing earnings reports. Read more.

New new world

European Regulators Come Down on Google’s Privacy Policy: When it comes to privacy, Google has never had it easy in Europe, a region home to some of the most survilled cities on earth. Just weeks after getting hit with a record $22.5 million U.S. fine for Internet privacy violations, Google (GOOG) is facing fresh criticism in Europe for its collection of users’ personal dat, reports Carol Matlack in Bloomberg Businessweek. Read the full story here.

This Tech Bubble Is Different: Bloomberg Businessweek’s Ashlee Vance takes you through the journey of Jeff Hammerbacher, a 23 yeard old math genius out of Harvard hired by Mark Zuckerberg at Facebook. The bigger story, of the so called tech bubble, unfolds through the 4 page article. The question? How is this tech bubble different from the previous ones. Read on.

Gadgetvice

Knowing When It Pays to Upgrade Your Gadgets: If a gadget breaks, gets lost or is stolen, it makes sense to replace it. But deciding whether to abandon an older, still-working device for a newer, shinier one can be a soul-sucking dilemma. Read more from The New York Times.

Entrepreneuring

Vivek Wadhwa’s recent study on Immigrant entrepreneurs in the valley was a top headline since its release earlier this month. Based on the study, which found that while number of immigrant founded startups in silicon valley have dropped “shockingly,” the number of Indian’s who started up went up. Almost one third of startups in the Valley were founded by Indians. Tim Devaney and Tom Stien ask why are Indians so entrepreneurial in the US? Read more.

Jeff Bezos says smart people change their minds: Amazon.com’s Founder and CEO Jeff Bezos says that people who are right a lot often change their minds. Bezos said he doesn’t think consistency of thought as a particularly positive trait. It’s better, even healthier in fact, to have an idea that contradicts one you had before. Read more from the man who built the largest e-commerce company in the world from scratch.

Technicolor

Soon, pack 10 terabits on tiny device: Are we getting closer to singularity? It would seem so indeed. A new discovery may open the way for the development of next generation data storage devices with capacities of up to 10 terabits (10 trillion bits) per square inch – vastly enhancing storage on much smaller data devices, Tech2 reports. Read more here.

/roots

Ada Lovelane (Image: Wikipedia)

From Ada Lovelace to Marissa Mayer: The Rise of Women in Tech: Every once in a while, we hear of women breaking the glass cieling and making it big in the corporate world. Most of us rubbish those claims as corporate gimmick. But without women, tech would not have been what it is today. An interesting infographic in the Mashable takes you through the history, from Ada Lovelace in 1800s– often described as the first computer programmer, to Marissa Mayer at Yahoo! in the 21st century. Take a look.

The History of GIFs: Ever wondered how GIFs came about? Read on about those cool animated things that have flashed across many a webpage, flickered within millions of MySpace profiles and glittered among innumerable Tumblrs. Stephanie Buck writes for Mashable: You’ve spotted them in animated advertising, email signatures, web forums and social avatars. Indeed, if I had to repurpose the acronym for “GIF” it would be “Great Internet Fun.” Read here.

Lifehack

Three Keys to Beating Information Overload: This piece does not suggest that you stop reading right now. Paul A Laudicina, a managing partner and Chairman of the board of A T Kearney and the author of “Beating the Global Odds: Successful Decision-Making in a Confused and Troubled World.” blogs at the Wall Street Journal that information overload is more about over consumption of information of the wrong kind than about actually being bogged town by too much information being thrown at you. Read more to find out what are the three steps to beat Information overload.

Big picture

True Progressivism: A new form of radical centrist politics is needed to tackle inequality without hurting economic growth argues The Economist. Read more here.

States of Play: With a little more than two weeks to go until Election Day in the US, the polls show the race to be as tight as ever, with very fluid findings in some states. Read on and see how Mitt Romney’s offense stacks up against Barack Obama’s defense.

How Relevant Is Marissa Mayer’s Maternity Leave? Not Very.

Add comment

NextBigWhat brings you curated insights and wisdom on product and growth from the wild web.

Over 2 million people receive our weekly curated insights.

Newsletter

Newsletter