Vaping and E-cigarettes in India: What’s really happening with Juul?

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Juul has become so popular that it is now about 68% of the $2 billion e-cigarette market.

Juuling is especially popular among children and young adults due to its sleek and discreet design, its ability to be recharged on a laptop or wall charger within one hour, and its liquid-filled cartridges that come in popular flavors like cool mint, creme brulee, and fruit medley.

Medical professionals are very concerned because juul delivers higher concentrations of nicotine than other e-cigarettes.

E-ciggarette company, Juul is working on India launch (in 2019).

But most state governments have already banned vaping and this collection will also help you understand the concept of vaping from different perspectives – the core being health.

1. The Dangers of JUUL

The amount of nicotine in one juul pod is equivalent to a pack of cigarettes!

Another reason why the juul is a unique threat to teens is its patented formula of nicotine. While other brands use a chemically modified form called “freebase nicotine,” juuls use “nicotine salts” that more closely resemble the natural structure of nicotine found in tobacco leaves. 

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2. JUUL is building its India leadership team

Juul has hired Uber India executive Rachit Ranjan as a senior public policy strategist. The company has also hired India-based Mastercard executive Rohan Mishra as head of government relations, as part of India launch strategy.

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3. Juul’s Underground market in India is thriving damn well.

“It’s literally the only thing people ask for,” said a vendor from Mumbai. He estimates Juul now accounts for 70% of his vaping business.

Juul is experiencing an unintentional bump in popularity in India, thanks to online and brick-and-mortar vendors who are reselling it on the unofficial gray market.

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4. India's health ministry calls for blocking Juul's entry into country

“Novel products such as ‘JUUL’ are harmful and addictive and could potentially undermine our tobacco control efforts,” Health Secretary Preeti Sudan wrote in her letter dated Feb. 18. 

“It is felt that the young generation would be particularly vulnerable to such products and gimmicks.” 

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