TheSunnyMagIt was the earnings season last week and we covered most of it in our daily newsreel.  For those who missed it by accident or by choice, here are the must read stories from around the web. Read M G Siegler’s take on Apples fourth quarter results here. Amazon lost more money in the third quarter. Surely, you have read about the Nexus leaks, Surface Tablets and Windows 8 already. Here, we bring you a selection of well written pieces from around the world that might be of interest. Happy weekend.

Inc.

Apple’s investment manager wrestles with $120bn problem: It is one of the world’s largest hedge funds, with $121bn under management, but its name is virtually unknown in financial circles. Braeburn Capital is not operated from the top floor of a Manhattan skyscraper or a plush Mayfair townhouse. It is located in a quiet suburb of Nevada’s capital, Reno, and it belongs to Apple. Juliette Garside takes a closer look. Read here.

The United States of Entrepreneurs: For all its current economic woes, America remains a beacon of entrepreneurialism. Between 1996 and 2004 it created an average of 550,000 small businesses every month. Many of those small businesses rapidly grow big. The world’s largest company, Wal-Mart, was founded in 1962 and did not go public until a decade later; multi-million dollar companies such as Google and Facebook barely existed a decade ago. Read more on The Economist.

New new world

Art.sy and the Myth of the Online Art Market: The last story that caught our attention on Art was by Glen Coco who said that he was sick of pretending and that he doesn’t get art. Coco, who has gone to art school and has an art related dissertation to his name, went around a few art exhibitions and figured that nobody wanted to be the first one to go up to the emperor and say “dude, I can see your arsehold.” Last week, Jason Farago did something similar. This wasn’t a piece that critiqued the art world, but one in which the writer argues that indeed,the most consequential shift in art since 1990 has been away from technology, not toward it. Read more here.

Is Wikipedia going commercial? Maura Ewing wonders if the greatest free resource on the web is drawing profit seeking writers? One such writer is Soraya Field Fiorio, a 27-year-old entertainment-relations consultant who has a sideline in writing commissioned Wikipedia articles for musicians and writers.She charges $30 an hour to edit an existing article, and will write a page from scratch for around $250. What gives? Read on.

Entrepreneuring

Travis Shrugged: The creepy, dangerous ideology behind Silicon Valley’s Cult of Disruption: On the Internet, its hard to sift through the noise and find anything that remotely resembles serious thought. In a deep, and scathing piece, Paul Carr worries if the next generation of Disruption will likely be founded by Randroids, funded by other Randroids. The case in point, is Travis Kalanick’s utter disregard for laws and regulation, even when it defies common sense. Kalanick is a proud adherent to the Cult of Disruption: the faddish Silicon Valley concept which essentially boils down to “let us do whatever we want, otherwise we’ll bully you on the Internet until you do.” To proponents of Disruption, the free market is king, and regulation is always the enemy. Read on.

Why we can’t solve big problems: Jason Pontin takes you through a small lesson in history to figure out what happened to humanity’s capacity to solve big problems. Recently, however, the complaint has developed a new stridency among Silicon Valley’s investors and entrepreneurs, although it is usually expressed a little differently: people say there is a paucity of real innovations. Instead, they worry, technologists have diverted us and enriched themselves with trivial toys. Read on to find out what prompted Peter Thiel to say “We wanted flying cars- instead we got 140 characters.”

Lance Armstrong banned, wiped off record books: Once a symbol of perseverance in the face of the most incredible odds, Lance Armstrong now seems destined to go down in history as one of the most brazen dope cheats that sport has ever seen. After sensationally conceding defeat in his fight to contest the charges against him in August, the Texan’s world caved in further on Monday when the International Cycling Union (UCI) erased him from the sport’s history. A tragic story.

Gadgetvice

Google has been springing leaks about its upcoming 10-inch Nexus tablet for weeks, revealing details about the iPad fighter that is widely expected to be unveiled Monday at an Android event in New York. But the most notable information leak comes from one of Google’s own top executives, Vic Gundotra. The exec posted two images to his Google+ profile Friday morning that, according to the listed photo details, were taken with a device called a Nexus 10. Read more.

Big picture

The United States of Entrepreneurs: For all its current economic woes, America remains a beacon of entrepreneurialism. Between 1996 and 2004 it created an average of 550,000 small businesses every month. Many of those small businesses rapidly grow big. The world’s largest company, Wal-Mart, was founded in 1962 and did not go public until a decade later; multi-million dollar companies such as Google and Facebook barely existed a decade ago. Read more on The Economist.

After Nuclear fission, India experiments with fusion: Countries, including India, are pooling resources to build a plant that runs on cleaner technology and abundant resources reports Cuckoo Paul in Forbes India. Read more here.

Decoding The Detail In Retail: Rama Bijapurkar, R Sriram and S Raghunandan write in Forbes India on why  there is no need for great celebration or for deep despair over the recently approved foreign direct investment in multi brand retail. “The facts, as we see it, tell us that it has become a symbolic issue, far beyond what reality demands it ought to be; and that there is no need for either great celebration or for deep despair over the idea that FDI in retail is,” they wrote. Read more.

NYT’s little problem in big China: China is the world’s biggest market but for western media firms trying to expand it can be a bruising experience, with even the biggest names such as Rupert Murdoch and Google having come a cropper, writes Lisa O’Carroll for The Guardian. Read moreThe liberal world was in outrage  over China’s move to censor the New York Times for exposing corruption at its top last week.

Lifehack

58 Digital Media Resources You May Have Missed: This is like a compilation within a compilation.  Mashable stories from the previous week that include information about digital products and resources. In addition to the details on new gadgets, with blockbuster movies like Lincoln and The Hobbit on the horizon, there is coverage on a must-have app that tells you the best times to use the bathroom during a movie.  Read at your own discretion.

A Windows 8 Cheat Sheet: The New York Times’ personal technology columnist David Pogue runs you through the two worlds that exist side by side on Windows 8. Read more here.

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