If higher education is mostly about signaling, you can make the world a better place by making it happen faster. "..the real value of education, for the people who get it, is signaling, not skills — memorably, he argues that a college is not so much a sculptor as an appraiser." If you were reinventing the Ivy League as a signaling-focused product, your stripped-down version might look like this: you invite a small cohort of talented people to move to a city for about three months, you host some social events so they get to know each other, you have them work on projects and you advise them on those, and afterwards you introduce them to a bunch of savvy rich people. In other words, you’d invent Y Combinator.

If higher education is mostly about signaling, you can make the world a better place by making it happen faster.

“..the real value of education, for the people who get it, is signaling, not skills — memorably, he argues that a college is not so much a sculptor as an appraiser.”

If you were reinventing the Ivy League as a signaling-focused product, your stripped-down version might look like this: you invite a small cohort of talented people to move to a city for about three months, you host some social events so they get to know each other, you have them work on projects and you advise them on those, and afterwards you introduce them to a bunch of savvy rich people (via).

In other words, you’d invent Y Combinator.