There are four core sections of a PRD — defining purpose, describing features, setting release criteria, sketching rough timing. According to Marty Cagan, the PRD’s goal is to explain the “What”, not the “How”. In each section, remember to be clear on the problem being solved versus the solution otherwise you may lead the team to make incorrect assumptions. The engineers, designers, and UX folks are the ones designing solutions for the product — don’t piss them off by making the PRD a recipe rather than a guideline.

https://medium.com/@uxpin/how-to-write-a-painless-product-requirements-document-508ff6807b4aThere are four core sections of a PRD — defining purpose, describing features, setting release criteria, sketching rough timing.

According to Marty Cagan, the PRD’s goal is to explain the “What”, not the “How”. In each section, remember to be clear on the problem being solved versus the solution otherwise you may lead the team to make incorrect assumptions.

The engineers, designers, and UX folks are the ones designing solutions for the product — don’t piss them off by making the PRD a recipe rather than a guideline.